APPENDIX V. LIST OF EDITS

August 16, 2018

Analysis of the poem Lpoek Nokor or Lpoek Angkor Vatt, written by Neak Pang Tat and dated 1620 CE, was included in the closing section of "Khmer Dance After Angkor."  These additions are noted through the footnotes 170a - 170o, and are surrounded by new commentary that reflects upon the inserted evidence.

September 25, 2018

The phrase "bavar vora chuop chap" was analyzed in relation to the goddess Moni Mekhala and the apsara of Lpoek Nokor. This is reflected in footnote 187a of "Khmer Dance After Angkor."

September 27, 2018

An analysis of Reab's epithets from the Middle Period were analyzed to further illustrate the use of frame tales, specifically in relationship to Moni Mekhala Ream Eyso and the Reamker. This is reflected in footnote 507a of "A Beauty That Doesn't Break."

October 6, 2018

A note of how five out six Khmer kings were Buddhist between 1080 CE - 1270 CE, as noted by Peter D. Sharrock. This is reflected in footnote 49a in the section "Sacred Roots II: Two Rain Dances."

An analysis of the story of Toyotama-bime and Yamasachi-biko from the Kojiki was compared with Preah Thaong Neang Neak, with further associations to Moni Mekhala Ream Eyso. This is reflected in footnote 59a in the section "Sacred Roots II: Two Rain Dances."

Tantric residues in contemporary Khmer culture were noted in the association of yogi and yogini with funerary rites, as the master of cremations in Cambodia are known as achar yogi.  This is reflected in footnote 65a in the section "Sacred Roots II: Two Rain Dances."

An explanation for the origin of the name Mani Mekhala is given, noting cross-cultural associations of jewel and water in the name Toyotama-bime. This is reflected in footnote 65b in the section "Sacred Roots II: Two Rain Dances."

November 26, 2018

Supporting evidence for post-Angkor court and dance culture was made through an analysis of the Khmer legend Preah Ko Preah Keo. This is reflected in footnotes 171a - 171d in the section "Khmer Dance After Angkor."

January 16, 2019

An analysis of Middle Khmer language related to the arts was made and is reflected in footnotes 171e - 171f in the section "Khmer Dance After Angkor."

An analysis of Middle Khmer language, specifically centered around the name Parjanya and words dealing with rain, was made and is reflected in footnote 110a in the section "Sacred Roots II: Two Rain Dances."

June 27, 2019

A note on the name of an ancient singer Stanottari was made, and how this is evidence for ancient sbai. This is reflected in footnote 206a in "Sacred Transformations."

A note on the names of ancient dancers were made, and is reflected in footnote 531a of "A Beauty That Doesn't Break."

September 1, 2019

An analysis of the Khmer Krom story of Neang Chan was added to the section "A Beauty That Doesn't Break" and is reflected in footnotes 510a - 510d.

Images from Banteay Chhmar, featuring a naga-riding divinity and female dancers, was added to the section "A Beauty That Doesn't Break."

September 3, 2019

A reference to the statuette of Manimekhala found at Pompeii was made, noted in 68a of "Sacred Roots II: Two Rain Dances."

General edits were made to the section "A Beauty That Doesn't Break."